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HIV Basics

HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) is a virus that can eventually lead to AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome) if there is no medical intervention. AIDS is also referred to as “late stage HIV”. Since its emergence in the 1980s, HIV has become the largest pandemic of recent history. HIV is a unique virus that thrives off of attacking a person’s immune system. When your immune system is too badly damaged from the virus, your body is no longer able to fight off common infections and certain cancers – which can be fatal.

What Happens If You Are Infected With HIV?

When a person acquires the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), they do not immediately develop signs and symptoms of an infection. When you are infected with HIV, your body will typically go through three stages. The First Stage (Acute HIV Infection) Most people at this stage do not have any idea…

What Is a Retrovirus?

A retrovirus belongs to a group of RNA viruses that insert a DNA copy of their genome into a host cell and replicates. Different Types of Retroviruses Human Retroviruses These are the types that affect humans most commonly. There are six human retroviruses that have been identified so far. These…

Does Everyone With HIV Develop AIDS?

Having HIV does not mean you will go on to develop AIDS. That being said, without treatment, HIV typically progresses to AIDS about 10 years after you first contract the disease (though this can be different for everyone). To stop this from happening, you will need to receive anti-retroviral therapy…

What Is the Difference Between HIV and AIDS?

What Is HIV? Many people confuse HIV and AIDS. While they go together, it is important to know that HIV stands for the Human Immunodeficiency Virus which is known to cause AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome). When a person develops AIDS, it is classified as Stage 3 HIV. HIV is known…

What Is HIV?

HIV, or Human Immunodeficiency Virus, is a virus that attacks the immune system. It it transmitted through blood, breast milk, semen, and vaginal/rectal fluids. It can only be passed through certain sexual activity, blood transfusions (before 1985), and by sharing syringes. Once in your system, HIV will begin attacking your…

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