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HPV

HPV, or human papillomavirus, is a very common virus. Currently, about 80% of the population will have some form of HPV in their lifetime. It can be transmitted very easily through skin-to-skin contact and is not limited to only sexual activity. HPV infections can vary from being relatively harmless, to appearing as genital warts, to causing cancer. There is currently no cure for HPV, but you can get vaccinated against many high-risk strains.

How Much Does the HPV Vaccine Cost?

Without insurance, the price for the HPV vaccine, Gardasil 9, is $217.11 per dose. The cost is covered by most health insurance plans and is free, minus office copays, for many patients. Those without insurance may also qualify for coverage through federally funded programs. Health Insurance Coverage…

What Do Genital Warts Look Like?

Genital warts look like small, skin-colored or whitish bumps that are flat or that resemble cauliflower. Just one bump may appear, you may have a cluster of bumps varying in size, or a close-knit cluster that resembles one larger wart. Genital warts are more common in women than in men. Where…

Are HPV and Genital Warts the Same Thing?

HPV and genital warts are not the same thing. However, genital warts may result from certain strains of HPV. Genital Warts as a Symptom of HPV Not everyone infected with HPV will have genital warts. In some cases, HPV causes no symptoms at all. Both men and women can develop…

Can You Get HPV From Kissing?

It’s unknown whether HPV can be spread by kissing. The virus can be passed during oral sex, but the evidence for whether you can be infected from kissing is inconclusive. How HPV Spreads HPV is a viral infection that spreads through direct skin-to-skin contact during vaginal, anal, or oral sex.

How Is HPV Diagnosed?

Women can be tested for HPV during a routine Pap smear or through home testing kits through companies like Nurx. There is currently no FDA-approved HPV test for men. What to Expect During an HPV Test HPV tests are typically conducted during a routine Pap smear, though it may also…

What Are the Causes of HPV?

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is caused by obtaining the virus through direct skin-to-skin contact and during sexual activity with someone who already has HPV. The virus is very common and often goes away on its own. However, certain strains of HPV may lead to more serious health issues. How HPV Is…

How Are Genital Warts Prevented?

You can prevent genital warts by avoiding sexual activity with someone infected with HPV that causes genital warts. If sexually active, using condoms can lower your risk of transmission. If you have not been sexually active, or do not currently have HPV, your best method of prevention would be talking…

What Are the Treatments for Genital Warts?

There are no treatments that can thoroughly remove genital warts, but there are medications and surgeries that can alleviate some of the symptoms associated with having them. After treatment, the lesions are likely to reappear at a later time. You may decide to seek treatment if the warts are causing…

How Are Genital Warts Diagnosed?

Genital warts can be diagnosed from visual inspections, pap smear, and DNA tests, or a combination. If your healthcare provider suspects that you might have genital warts, they may start by visually checking for the presence of warts. Common Locations of Warts In men, warts are most commonly visible on…

What Are the Causes of Genital Warts?

In most cases, genital warts are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). There are between 30 to 40 strains of HPV that can have an effect on the genital region. Only a few of these will actually result in genital warts. Genital warts are often classified as a Sexually Transmitted…

What Are the Symptoms of Genital Warts?

The symptoms of genital warts include small, gray or flesh-colored swellings on the genital area or several warts clustered together that form a cauliflower shape. Other symptoms that you may experience include discomfort and itching in the genital area, or bleeding during sexual intercourse. In women, a genital wart may…

How Old Do You Have to Be to Get the HPV Vaccine?

The FDA has approved the HPV vaccine for all girls and boys at ages 9-12. At this early age, only two doses of the HPV vaccine are necessary for immunity. However, when you’re older, you may need three doses instead of the regular two. The HPV vaccine has been recommended…

Can Men Get Tested for HPV?

To date, there is no FDA-approved HPV test for men. The currently available HPV tests have only been studied in women and are not often used to screen men who may have HPV. However, some experts suggest that the same HPV test used to screen women for cervical cancer can…

Can Men Get the HPV Vaccine?

There is an FDA-approved HPV vaccine for both men and women. The Gardasil 9 vaccine is the only approved HPV vaccine in the U.S. It can prevent infections from most high-risk HPV strains. The HPV vaccine can be administered to boys as young as 9 through age 26. Two shots…

Does the HPV Vaccine Protect Against All Strains of HPV?

Clinical trials of Gardasil 9, the only HPV vaccine available in the U.S., has shown that it provides nearly 100% protection against cervical infections with HPV strains 16 and 18. Gardasil 9 has also been found to be almost 100% effective in preventing cervical, vulvar, and vaginal disease caused by…

Is There a Cure for HPV?

There is no cure for the human papillomavirus (HPV), but in most cases, the body clears it on its own. It’s possible to treat genital warts, precancerous cervical lesions and HPV-related cancers that are caused by certain strains of the virus. Low-Risk vs. High-Risk HPV Strains HPV has low-risk and…

Do All Strains of HPV Cause Cancer?

No, all strains of HPV do not cause cancer. There is a higher probability of cancer with high-risk HPV strains versus low-risk HPV strains. High-Risk HPV Strains There are more than 200 strains of HPV, but not all of them are harmful. Nearly 40 strains of HPV are transmitted sexually;…

How Is HPV Transmitted?

HPV is transmitted through both sexual and nonsexual skin-to-skin contact. Any contact with affected skin can spread the virus. However, it’s most commonly spread through skin contact when having vaginal, anal, or oral sex. Condoms can reduce the risk of transmitting HPV to your partner during sexual activity, but they…

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