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STIs

Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) are incredibly common. In fact, there are 20 million new STI cases in the United States per year, and nearly half of these occur in young people aged 15 – 24.

Can You Get an STD From Kissing?

You can only get a few sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) from kissing, including herpes simplex virus (HSV), cytomegalovirus and (rarely) syphilis. Most STDs only spread through unprotected sexual contact. STDs You Can Get From Kissing The STDs you can get from kissing someone who’s infected include HSV types 1 and…

Why is a blood test better than a saliva test for HIV?

HIV tests that rely on saliva can’t detect HIV until someone has been infected for 3 months or more — that’s how long it takes for enough virus to build up in the body to be detected in saliva. However, blood spot tests like the one included in…

How Do You Prevent Molluscum Contagiosum?

Molluscum contagiosum, a viral infection that affects the skin, can be prevented by avoiding contact with an infected person or their personal items — but of course that’s hard, since you likely don’t know who is infected. You can lessen your chances of contracting the virus, or of sharing it…

How Do You Treat Molluscum Contagiosum?

Treatment for molluscum contagiosum isn’t necessary if your immune system is healthy, as the bumps will eventually fade away and the virus will leave the body. There are some situations in which treatment may be recommended, however. You would be a good candidate for medical intervention if: You have large…

How Do You Get Molluscum Contagiosum?

You can get molluscum contagiosum from skin-to-skin contact with an infected person, or by coming into contact with an object that an infected person had used on their bare skin. Since the virus can survive on surfaces after an infected person has come in contact with it, it can be…

What Are the Symptoms of Molluscum Contagiosum?

Symptoms of molluscum contagiosum include groups of bumps and lesions that are usually painless. Once you come in contact with the virus, the symptoms may not be apparent for up to six months even though the infection is in your body. The average incubation period for the infection is between…

What Is Molluscum Contagiosum?

Molluscum contagiosum is a viral skin infection that can lead to lesions or raised bumps on the top of your skin. The bumps are usually painless and will disappear on their own once the virus leaves your body, which can take anywhere from two months to four years. There are…

How Do You Prevent Hepatitis B?

You can prevent the infectious liver disease hepatitis B by getting vaccinated and by following certain lifestyle practices. The infection spreads through the body fluids (such as blood and semen) of an affected individual. Some people contract a short-term type of hepatitis B that the body clears on its own.

What Is the Treatment for Hepatitis B?

There is no treatment for either the acute (short-term) or the chronic (lifelong) form of hepatitis B. If the virus does not clear on its own, however, you can take medication to prevent the virus from causing liver damage. Treating Acute Hepatitis B People who first contract the virus develop…

How Do You Get Hepatitis B?

You get hepatitis B after blood, vaginal fluids, or semen infected with the hepatitis B virus enters your system. You can get hepatitis B doing the following things with someone who has the infection: Having condomless sex. Sharing unsterilized needles for tattoos, piercing, or drugs. Sharing razors, glucose monitors, and…

What Is Hepatitis B?

Hepatitis B is an infection caused by blood, semen, or vaginal fluids contaminated with the hepatitis B virus. It causes inflammation of the liver. If left untreated, hepatitis B can cause cirrhosis, liver cancer, and liver failure. Types of Hepatitis B Hepatitis B can be acute or chronic. New cases…

What Are the Symptoms of Hepatitis B?

Hepatitis B can cause similar symptoms to other liver diseases, including other types of hepatitis. However, most people with hepatitis B show no symptoms at all. Hepatitis B symptoms are more common in the acute phase than the chronic phase. Symptoms of Acute Hepatitis B Between…

How Do You Prevent Lymphogranuloma Venereum (LGV)?

Safer sex practices help prevent the spread of lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV). Use a condom every time you have sex, even if you’re on birth control, to protect yourself from LGV and other sexually transmitted infections. You should also use a dental dam for oral sex and gloves…

What Is the Treatment for Lymphogranuloma Venereum (LGV)?

Lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) can be resolved with a course of antibiotics. The most common meds for LGV are: Doxycycline 100mg, twice daily for 21 days Erythromycin 500mg, four times daily for 21 days Azithromycin 1gm, once a week for 21 days Antibiotic…

What Are the Symptoms of Lymphogranuloma Venereum (LGV)?

People with lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) may have lesions around their genitals, their rectum, or both of these places, depending on their sexual activity. The look and behavior of the lesions changes with the infection’s three distinct stages. In the latter two stages, people may also have swollen lymph nodes in…

How Do You Get Lymphogranuloma Venereum (LGV)?

You get lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) from contact with the chlamydia trachomatis bacteria that causes this infection. This usually occurs either during condomless sex with a person who has LGV or skin-to-skin contact with the lesions it causes. You can get LGV during vaginal, anal, and oral sex. Your partner doesn’t…

What Is Lymphogranuloma Venereum (LGV)?

Lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) is a sexually-transmitted infection caused by rare and aggressive forms of chlamydia trachomatis bacteria. LGV attacks the lymph nodes around the genitals or anus. Phases of LGV The first phase of LGV is known as the incubation phase. During this phase, which usually lasts between two and…

What’s the Difference Between a Chancre and a Chancroid?

A chancre is a symptom of syphilis, while a chancroid is a symptom of the STI of the same name. It’s easy to see why people confuse these two lesions, as they are both caused by sexually transmitted bacterial infections. They also typically appear on the genitals and mouth. However,…

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