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Ocella

Ocella is a combination birth control pill that uses a blend of two hormones, estrogen and progestin, that simulate pregnancy in your body so real pregnancy doesn’t happen. It’s a generic form of the wildly popular Yasmin, and we highly recommend it here at Nurx™. Ocella is especially effective at acne control. However, Ocella and other combination pills should not be taken by women over 35 who smoke.

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FAQ

  • Does Ocella Cause Hair Loss?

    If hair loss runs in your family, it may be hormone-based. If that's the case, there's a chance that Ocella can make things worse — or better — for you. It's all pretty personal. The good news is, if you experience problems and stop taking Ocella, things should return to normal after a few months.

  • Can Ocella Help With Acne Problems?

    Dermatologists have long been prescribing birth control to those with hormone-based acne problems. Yasmin and its generic equivalents, like Ocella, are top choices. This is due to the anti-androgenic type of progestin (drospirenone) that's used in them. Drospirenone has been proven much more effective at fighting acne than many other options on the market today.

  • Does Ocella Have Any Side Effects?

    Your chances of experiencing side effects from Ocella are very rare. Some of the milder ones are nausea, vomiting, headaches, breast tenderness, and swelling of the feet or ankles. Diabetics should take note that Ocella can affect blood sugar levels. Elevated blood pressure is also possible. Serious side effects have been documented, though these are extremely rare. Some of these include migraines or severe headaches, blood clotting, heart disease, and vision problems (especially for those who are nearsighted or wear contacts). Stroke-like symptoms, such as dizziness, fainting, slurred speech, and numbness on one side of the body, are also a remote possibility.

  • What Are Some Precautions When Taking Ocella?

    Though incidents are rare, allergies to either the hormones or the inactive ingredients in Ocella may occur. The symptoms will be familiar to allergy sufferers — itching, rashes, trouble breathing, dizziness, and swollen lips, tongue, face, or throat. If you have a history of certain health problems, Ocella may not be for you. It's important to discuss your medical history with your doctor or one of our knowledgeable Nurx advisors before starting Ocella, especially if you've been affected by heart problems, issues with blood clotting, high blood pressure, diabetes, or cancer.

  • Is Ocella Easy to Get?

    As a generic brand of Yasmin, a pill that's widely used and enjoyed, Ocella is a snap to obtain. It's available at just about any pharmacy in the United States. You'll need a prescription, though. For those who want the ultimate convenience and privacy, check out our services here at Nurx. We'll hook you up with a real doctor in your state who's able to offer advice, answer questions, and provide a prescription right over the internet. Many health insurance firms cover birth control, and since Ocella is generic, it's especially cost-effective for them. We accept multiple providers here at Nurx, and we're always working on growing our list. We're happy to help you through any hassles with your insurance company.

  • How Does Ocella Work?

    Ocella comes in packs of 28. You'll get 21 yellow active pills that contain hormones and seven white tablets that are inactive and are used only as reminder pills. Afterward, you'll begin a new pack. To minimize side effects and ensure that your pill is as effective as possible in preventing pregnancy, you should take Ocella at the same time each day. After dinner or just before bed is a smart choice.

  • Any Other Important Information?

    As with most drugs, there's a small chance that Ocella can react negatively to other things in your body. When speaking with one of our Nurx advisors, be sure to mention anything you're currently taking, even if it's just an herbal supplement or over-the-counter medication. Specifically, meds for chronic hepatitis C, seizures, HIV, and cancer should all be discussed. Some of them can cause bad reactions, and others (like St. John's wort) can make Ocella less effective at preventing pregnancy.

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