FAQ

Here are some of the questions we hear most often from our users. If you can't find the answer you are looking for, send us an email at support@nurx.co or call us at (800) 321-NURX.

Top 10 FAQs

How long does it take for my shipment to arrive?

Birth Control shipments: 3-5 business days

Birth control shipments take about 3-5 business days to arrive after you complete your prescription request. To speed up the process, make sure your request contains all the info our doctor will need:
  • Clear photo of your ID (passport, driver's license, school ID, etc)
  • Complete health questionnaire
  • Up-to-date delivery address
  • Valid credit or debit card for any copays or out-of-pocket costs
  • If using insurance, a clear photo of the front and back of your Rx insurance card
    • Coverage must be active
    • The card should have the ID, Rx BIN, Rx PCN, and Rx Group #s
    • The name and date of birth associated with your insurance plan matches your photo ID
Also, please be prepared to provide the results of a blood pressure check taken in the past 6 months.

Truvada shipments: 5-7 business days

Truvada shipments are prepared in 3 phases. This process can take as few as 5-7 business days:
  • Phase 1: Approximately 2-3 days for Nurx to review your benefits and medical questions.
  • Phase 2: A medical provider will refer you to a lab facility, where you must go to have lab work done at your convenience. Sample processing can take a few days.
  • Phase 3: After Nurx receives your results, the processing and shipping of the medication can take an additional 3-4 business days.
Please be sure that you are present at the shipping address for delivery, as Truvada shipments require a signature for delivery.

Why did I receive 1 pack instead of 3?

If you used insurance:

Some insurance companies only cover 1 pack every month. In these cases, Nurx will only ship 1 month at a time to make the most of your insurance benefits. Nurx automatically refills your prescription on the earliest date that your insurance will allow to make sure you do not run out of your prescription.

If you did not use insurance:

Please reach out to Nurx in your Nurx Messenger and we will investigate.

How does Nurx work?

Nurx is a hassle-free way to get birth control and PrEP. Click Get Started on the Nurx home page and follow a few simple steps:

  1.  Select the prescription you'd like or select the option to get a doctor's advice on which method might work best for you.
  2. Answer a few health questions.
  3. Enter your demographic information & complete your order.
A licensed medical provider will review your prescription request and write a prescription once they've reviewed your health history. A Nurx partner pharmacy will fill your prescription and Nurx will ship the prescription to you. The whole process takes about 3-5 business days once we receive your complete request with all the information we need. Nurx automatically refills and ships your prescription. You can also Watch This Video to hear more about the process!

What birth control should I select?

You can find information about different pills and methods directly on our website if you'd like to research on your own.

Making a Selection

If you're not sure what pill or method is best for you, choose the "Let the doctor select a pill for me!" option here. A doctor will review your medical history and help find an option that is well suited for you. The doctor will confirm the prescription with you before we ship your order. It is no problem if you are not sure what birth control you want to pick, or are exploring comparable options to something you were previously prescribed! We can help after we've reviewed more of your health history. Please complete the full survey and mention any concerns about side effects or cost. After reviewing your request, a physician will be in contact about a recommendation for you.

Learn More About All Your Options

Bedsider also contains detailed information about various birth control methods.  

I don’t know what to order. Can you help me choose?

Yes! If you're not sure what prescription is best for you, follow these simple steps:

  1. Click Get Started on Nurx
  2. Choose the "Let the doctor select a pill for me!" option
  3. Answer a few health questions
  4. Complete your Nurx sign-up
  5. A medical provider will reach out to you with a recommendation or follow up questions
You can also explore options on your own using our interactive tools.

How do refills work?

Nurx automatically refills your prescription for 1 year from the time you begin using our service. If you use insurance, refills are sent as soon as your insurance company will pay for your prescription to be refilled. You can update your address directly in Nurx if you move. You can also Message us at any time if you have questions or would like to change the prescription we refill for you.

How much does Nurx cost?

Nurx's consultation and standard shipping are free. The cost for birth control, PrEP, and emergency contraceptives depends on if you are insured and your insurance plan:

  • With health insurance: Your birth control prescription is free in most cases.
    • Insurance companies set the cost or 'copay' for prescriptions. Usually this is $0 - it can range depending on your plan and the prescription that you and your doctor select.
    • Nurx charges the copay set by your insurance when your prescription is filled.
    • Please call your insurance company if you would like to know your copay.
  • Without health insurance: You can purchase your birth control through Nurx starting at $15 per pack.
To pick up your birth control prescription at a non-Nurx pharmacy, a small service fee applies.

Where is Nurx available?

Nurx ships to:

  • California
  • New York
  • Washington, DC
  • Pennsylvania
  • Illinois
  • Washington
  • Florida
  • Michigan
  • New Jersey
  • Minnesota
  • Missouri
  • Virginia
If you don't see your state listed here, email us at support@nurx.co. We will let you know when we're in your state!

About Nurx

How does Nurx work?

Nurx is a hassle-free way to get birth control and PrEP. Click Get Started on the Nurx home page and follow a few simple steps:

  1.  Select the prescription you'd like or select the option to get a doctor's advice on which method might work best for you.
  2. Answer a few health questions.
  3. Enter your demographic information & complete your order.
A licensed medical provider will review your prescription request and write a prescription once they've reviewed your health history. A Nurx partner pharmacy will fill your prescription and Nurx will ship the prescription to you. The whole process takes about 3-5 business days once we receive your complete request with all the information we need. Nurx automatically refills and ships your prescription. You can also Watch This Video to hear more about the process!

Is there an age restriction for getting on birth control with Nurx?

Minimum age requirements for birth control vary by state. You must be at least 12 years of age to be considered, and state-by-state regulations may require that a patient be older in order to receive service Please check your local laws for clarification. The risks of hormonal contraception increase for women age 50 and over, and your regular doctor is in the best position to help you safely manage your contraception needs.

Where are your drugs sourced from?

Drugs are shipped directly from a licensed pharmacy near you. We will automatically pick a pharmacy near you that can send out the drugs. If you want, we can send your script to another pharmacy of your choosing, but then you will have to pick up your prescription in person.

Who are your doctors?

Our provider team are licensed clinicians in your state, and most are specialized in an area related to Nurx services.

I don’t know what to order. Can you help me choose?

Yes! If you're not sure what prescription is best for you, follow these simple steps:

  1. Click Get Started on Nurx
  2. Choose the "Let the doctor select a pill for me!" option
  3. Answer a few health questions
  4. Complete your Nurx sign-up
  5. A medical provider will reach out to you with a recommendation or follow up questions
You can also explore options on your own using our interactive tools.

Can I use Nurx if I’ve never used birth control before?

Yes. We can start you on birth control pills. If you know what pill you want, you can choose it through Nurx. Our doctors are also happy to help you find a pill that works for you and answer any questions you have about birth control. Get Started Now

Where can I provide feedback or get in contact?

You can email us at any time at support@nurx.co . Alternatively, you can call us at 1-800-321-NURX (6879) between 8am and 5pm PST.

What are Nurx’s Hours?

Nurx can be accessed 24/7 and you can send us a message at any time. Messages are responded to by the next business day or sooner. Phone support is available Monday - Friday, 8AM to 5PM Pacific Standard Time at 800-321-6879.

Where is Nurx available?

Nurx ships to:

  • California
  • New York
  • Washington, DC
  • Pennsylvania
  • Illinois
  • Washington
  • Florida
  • Michigan
  • New Jersey
  • Minnesota
  • Missouri
  • Virginia
If you don't see your state listed here, email us at support@nurx.co. We will let you know when we're in your state!

Is Nurx safe?

Yes. Drugs prescribed and supplied through the Nurx platform are prescribed using the exact same rules and guidelines as your family physician would use. The doctor will never prescribe a medication unless it is safe to do so based on the information they are provided with.

Who is Nurx for?

Anyone who needs birth control or Truvada for PrEP can use Nurx. Get Started Now

Cost and insurance

How will a receipt show on my bank or credit card statement?

The transaction record will show Nurx.co and the amount. Details regarding a prescription will not appear on the transaction record.

Do you accept Medicaid?

We currently accept CA Medicaid, which covers birth control pills. We are currently unable to accept most plans under NY, IL, PA, DC, or WA Medicaid.

How much does Nurx cost?

Nurx's consultation and standard shipping are free. The cost for birth control, PrEP, and emergency contraceptives depends on if you are insured and your insurance plan:

  • With health insurance: Your birth control prescription is free in most cases.
    • Insurance companies set the cost or 'copay' for prescriptions. Usually this is $0 - it can range depending on your plan and the prescription that you and your doctor select.
    • Nurx charges the copay set by your insurance when your prescription is filled.
    • Please call your insurance company if you would like to know your copay.
  • Without health insurance: You can purchase your birth control through Nurx starting at $15 per pack.
To pick up your birth control prescription at a non-Nurx pharmacy, a small service fee applies.

Order and delivery

How long does it take for my shipment to arrive?

Birth Control shipments: 3-5 business days

Birth control shipments take about 3-5 business days to arrive after you complete your prescription request. To speed up the process, make sure your request contains all the info our doctor will need:
  • Clear photo of your ID (passport, driver's license, school ID, etc)
  • Complete health questionnaire
  • Up-to-date delivery address
  • Valid credit or debit card for any copays or out-of-pocket costs
  • If using insurance, a clear photo of the front and back of your Rx insurance card
    • Coverage must be active
    • The card should have the ID, Rx BIN, Rx PCN, and Rx Group #s
    • The name and date of birth associated with your insurance plan matches your photo ID
Also, please be prepared to provide the results of a blood pressure check taken in the past 6 months.

Truvada shipments: 5-7 business days

Truvada shipments are prepared in 3 phases. This process can take as few as 5-7 business days:
  • Phase 1: Approximately 2-3 days for Nurx to review your benefits and medical questions.
  • Phase 2: A medical provider will refer you to a lab facility, where you must go to have lab work done at your convenience. Sample processing can take a few days.
  • Phase 3: After Nurx receives your results, the processing and shipping of the medication can take an additional 3-4 business days.
Please be sure that you are present at the shipping address for delivery, as Truvada shipments require a signature for delivery.

Why did I receive 1 pack instead of 3?

If you used insurance:

Some insurance companies only cover 1 pack every month. In these cases, Nurx will only ship 1 month at a time to make the most of your insurance benefits. Nurx automatically refills your prescription on the earliest date that your insurance will allow to make sure you do not run out of your prescription.

If you did not use insurance:

Please reach out to Nurx in your Nurx Messenger and we will investigate.

Do you offer overnight delivery of emergency contraceptives (Plan B)?

Yes, we offer these services overnight, please be sure to let the doctor know that you need it ASAP. To avoid any delivery delays, we can also call prescriptions in to local pharmacies for you to pick up if you need it urgently.

Will I be able to track my shipment?

Yes. Nurx will send you a tracking link when the order leaves the pharmacy. You can use this link to track your package and get updates on the status of delivery.

Does everyone who gets a prescription through Nurx have the opportunity to talk to a doctor?

Yes. When you make your initial request you can let us know you want to talk to a doctor. You can also chat with the doctor via secure messaging, phone or video.

Are options like Nuvaring being offered?

Yes, we offer the ring and the patch. Get Nuvaring Here Get the Patch Here

What types of birth control do you offer?

We offer most oral contraceptive that local pharmacies stock. In addition to this we offer the the skin patch and the vaginal ring. We do our best to keep a consistent brand for each user, however due to multiple circumstances, you may receive another generic alternative for your prescription medication.

How many pills can I get?

We do our best to send you 3 months at a time through your insurance. If your insurance limits you to 1 month at a time, we will properly time your refills so that you never miss a pill.

Can I get a refill of my existing birth control pill?

Yes, please send us a message via your Nurx Message window if you would like a refill and signed up with Nurx in the past 12 months. We may also ask you some follow up questions, or to fill out a new request to make sure that your prescription and delivery meets your expectations.

How can I cancel an order I just placed?

Go to your profile, under the order details there is a blue button that reads "Message Us". Start a message and request the cancellation. One of our team members will complete your request within minutes.

How will the contraceptives arrive?

Contraceptives are delivered by USPS via 2-day priority mail.

How fast can I get my birth control?

We provide free delivery, which in most cases is within 72hrs after your request has been approved by a medical provider. Prescription deliveries will happen anywhere between 2 - 4 days from an order being approved. If you are interested in an expedited delivery service in the SF Bay Area, please contact us directly by sending us a Message in your Nurx profile, or by calling 1-800-321-NURX between 9am and 5pm PST.

How do refills work?

Nurx automatically refills your prescription for 1 year from the time you begin using our service. If you use insurance, refills are sent as soon as your insurance company will pay for your prescription to be refilled. You can update your address directly in Nurx if you move. You can also Message us at any time if you have questions or would like to change the prescription we refill for you.

Privacy and safety

Does Nurx share information with my primary care physician?

If you want us to, we can share your information with your primary care physician. We believe it is a good idea for your primary care physician to have a full picture of your health, and encourage you to share the health information we have about you with your primary care physician. You're in control though, so we will not send them anything without your express permission.

Who does Nurx share my information with?

Nurx does not share your information with anyone without your permission.

I’m on my parents’ insurance, will they find out that I got birth control from Nurx?

Nurx won't tell your parent(s) or anyone else that you are on birth control. As part of regular health insurance communications, your insurance company sends some of your confidential health information – like the services you received and when – to the policy holder of your health plan.

You may be able to protect your privacy by contacting your insurance company to request that they disclose your sensitive health information - including birth control and STI care - to you only. If you contact your insurance provider directly to ask them to suppress your sensitive health information from your insurance plan holder, we cannot guarantee making this request with your insurance company will protect your sensitive health information from the policy holder of your plan. But if you don’t make the request, your information will be disclosed to the policy holder in regular health insurance communications. If you’re on someone else’s insurance plan, the surest way to keep payments related to your birth control private is to not use insurance at all and pay out of pocket with a debit or credit card. Should you choose this, our medical team is happy to help you find a birth control that fits your budget. If you live in California, your insurer is required by law to honor your request to keep your sensitive health information private. Learn more about how to make a request here: http://www.myhealthmyinfo.org/ Your insurance company may share information about your claims with your parents. Unfortunately, we have no control over the information disclosed by your insurance company. Please contact your insurance company to find out what information they will share with a parent or plan holder.

Are payments safe?

Yes! All payments are processed through industry standard credit card systems.

Is my information safe?

Your information is transmitted to Nurx using industry standard encryption, and stored in encrypted form on our servers according to strict federal standards, including HIPAA.

PrEP

What is PrEP?

Pre-exposure prophylaxis (or PrEP) is a method of HIV prevention where individuals take an anti-HIV medication on a daily basis to stop HIV from taking hold and spreading throughout the body. It is highly effective for preventing HIV if taken daily, but it is much less effective when not taken consistently. Daily PrEP reduces the risk of getting HIV from sex up to 99%. Among people who inject drugs, it reduces the risk by more than 70%. Your risk of getting HIV from sex can be even lower if you combine PrEP with condoms, treatment as prevention (TasP), and other prevention methods.

What medications are available for PrEP?

Right now, Truvada (emtricitabine and tenofovir) is the only FDA approved medication for PrEP for those 18 years of age and older. Others are currently being studied, (like cabotegravir, dapivirine, and TAF), but they are years away from FDA approval.

Is PrEP right for me?

Deciding to begin PrEP is a highly personal decision that no one can make for you. When thinking about whether or not PrEP may be right for you, start out by taking your risk factors for HIV into consideration. Here are the CDC’s recommendations for good PrEP candidates: 18 years of age or older, currently HIV negative, and also meet one of the following criteria:

  •     In a sexual relationship with an HIV positive partner, especially if that person is not on ART therapy or is not virologically suppressed.
  •     In a sexual relationship with a single partner of unknown HIV status, or have multiple partners of unknown HIV status.
  •     One or more incidences of condomless anal or vaginal sex in the last 6 months
  •     Diagnosis of rectal or vaginal gonorrhea and/or chlamydia, or syphilis in the last 6 months
  •     Inject drugs not prescribed by a medical provider, or share works for drug preparation.
  •     Have an HIV positive partner and trying to get pregnant.
If any of the above listed criteria sound like you, you’re most likely a good candidate for PrEP.

Who may not be a candidate for PrEP?

  1.     People who are already HIV positive should not take PrEP. Truvada on its own in not enough to treat HIV. Usually one or two additional medications are needed to successfully achieve virologic suppression.
  2.     People who have symptoms of acute HIV (symptoms similar to the flu) or have been exposed to HIV in the last 72 hours (PEP, or post-exposure prophylaxis, would be more appropriate).
  3.     People with active Hepatitis B should not take PrEP. Since Truvada can be used to treat active HBV, stopping the drug suddenly could cause a flare up of the virus. If your screening test comes back positive for HBV, we will refer you to your primary care provider for further evaluation and care.
  4.     People with uncontrolled diabetes could possibly take PrEP, but under very close provider supervision. Truvada is excreted by the kidneys, and those with uncontrolled diabetes will often spill sugar into their urine. This causes quite a stress on the kidneys.  Getting one’s blood sugar under control is an extremely important first step.
  5.     People with impaired kidney function should not take PrEP. This means that if your creatinine clearance is less than 60mL/min, it might be too hard on your kidneys to take Truvada. This value will be monitored closely as long as you are on PrEP to ensure it doesn’t go down dramatically. Small fluctuations during the course of taking PrEP are normal.
  6.   Please don’t take PrEP unless it has been prescribed for you by a medical provider.

How effective is PrEP at preventing new HIV infections?

When taken as prescribed, Truvada is up to 99% effective. The more regularly you take Truvada as prescribed (up to 7 pills per week), the better the level of protection. The efficacy of Truvada as PrEP has been studied extensively - read more on the studies that helped pave the way for Truvada’s FDA approval.

How long do I have to take PrEP until I’m protected?

It takes 7-10 days for therapeutic levels of Truvada to build up in rectal tissue. It can take up to 21 days for vaginal tissue and for injection drug use until full protection is reached. There is no data available for oral tissue.

What are the risks of taking Truvada? What about side effects?

Taking any sort of medication carries risk, though these risks can be minimal. If you experience side effects, tell your healthcare provider immediately. He or she can help you develop a strategy for taking the medication that minimizes the side effects. It’s possible to see a significant decrease in kidney function while taking Truvada. Normal kidney function is restored once Truvada is stopped. If Truvada is stopped due to kidney issues, once normal function resumes, usually individuals can try taking Truvada again. Although rare, reports of a loss of bone density has been reported in some users. This was reversed when Truvada was stopped. Negative side effects, if experienced, can include:

  •     Nausea and vomiting
  •     Gastrointestinal upset including diarrhea and gas
  •     Headaches
  •     Strange vivid dreams
Potential positive side effects can also occur:
  •     Reduced anxiety around HIV
  •     Finding you have the mental and emotional will to take control of your sexual health
Most negative side effects are considered a “start-up syndrome,” meaning that they will go away with continued use of Truvada. For most people, side effects are mild enough to continue taking the drug, although sometimes the side effects are prolonged and severe.

Is it OK to stop PrEP when I don’t need it and start up again when I do?

Starting and stopping PrEP depends on your healthcare provider's recommendation.  According to iPrEx lead researcher Dr. Robert Grant: "People go through 'seasons of risk,' periods of their lives when they are at risk for acquiring HIV, and PrEP is appropriate for those times. In periods when they have negotiated safety with a partner or they’re just not having much sex, they may find they don’t need PrEP. It’s actually appropriate that some people stop PrEP, because they’re in a different phase of their life and they no longer need it." There has been a lot of media attention focused on the IPERGAY study, or on-demand dosing of Truvada. Further analysis of the data is needed to determine whether or not this is a viable HIV prevention strategy. To date, the only FDA approved regimen is daily dosing. If you are considering stopping Truvada, it is recommended that you keep taking it for 28 days after the last possible exposure to HIV. If you have active Hepatitis B, please consult your primary care provider to stop Truvada safely.

 How do I get started on PrEP with Nurx?

Log on to nurx.com/prep and click "Get Started on PrEP" Answer questions about your general health, current risk for HIV, and some questions about future risk. Then, upload a photo ID and clear photos of the front and back of your insurance card(s) to our site, and provide us with your preferred shipping address. A PrEP expert will work with you to navigate the potential costs associated with the prescription. It is ultimately the patient's responsibility to verify insurance benefits and costs of labs and medication prior to receiving services. There is no cost for the Nurx service itself, but insurance copays and lab administration fees may apply. A medical provider will review your prescription request and advise you on next steps.

How do I pay for PrEP? Do you accept insurance for PrEP?

What insurance plans are accepted for PrEP?

For PrEP prescriptions, Nurx can work with:
  • Most PPO plans
  • Some California Medi-Cal plans
  • Some Medicare plans (with or without Part D coverage)
We'll review your benefits with you before we finalize your prescription request. We will also advise you to check your insurance benefits directly with your insurer to verify which lab facility they prefer, and which questions to ask your insurance provider to better empower you to get your care and medication at the lowest possible cost.  Wait…I don’t see my plan listed above. What about Kaiser, the VA, or HMOs? For Truvada, we currently cannot accept:
  • Kaiser
  • Veterans Administration (the VA) coverage
  • Most HMOs
  • Medicaid plans in NY, WA, DC, VA or PA
For lab work to be covered, the lab order must come from either your primary care provider or a provider in your plan’s network. If you have one of these plans, you may still be able to get access to PrEP: 
  • Kaiser: Your primary care provider can prescribe PrEP for you. If he or she isn’t comfortable doing so, they can refer you to an infectious disease specialist.
  • The VA: Covers PrEP in full as long as your care happens in their clinics.
  • HMOs: Utilize a network of providers and require care to come from within that network. The good news is that usually those networks are large, so patients have many providers to choose from.

Do I need to use an in-network provider or lab for PrEP?

Some insurance companies require you to use a certain set of providers or lab facilities to reduce costs on your insurance plan. If you're not sure what network or lab your insurance prefers, please check with your insurance in advance of receiving services. On the back of your insurance card, you’ll find an 800 number for customer service. Call your plan’s customer service number to ask if they require in-network providers, and if they have a preferred lab. It’s best to check on this to avoid nasty surprise bills for out of network labs or services. If you're not sure how to have this conversation with your insurance, we are happy to help, just send us a message!

I have insurance, but I have a very high deductible. Can you help me get on PrEP?

Possibly. First, it helps to understand deductibles, and how they work:

What is a deductible?

The deductible is the amount you’ll be responsible for meeting out of pocket before your insurance kicks in. For example, a typical Bronze level ACA plan in California carries a $6,850 deductible, meaning you’ll pay full price for your medical care, labs and diagnostic tests, and medications until the total reaches $6,850. Then, your plan’s copays or coinsurance costs will apply.

For most people, high deductibles are difficult to meet on one’s own. 3 types of assistance plans exist to address this financial barrier, and each has specific requirements:
  1. Gilead Copay Card - Gilead, the manufacturer of Truvada, offers a copay card pre-loaded with $3,600 to help with deductibles and copay costs. Individuals must be insured to be able to use this card, however, Medicare, Medicaid, and Tricare patients are not eligible. There are no monthly limits. Cards are valid for 12 fills, and will reload itself every January. Amounts left on the card at the end of the year do not roll over.
  2. Patient Access Network, or PAN: As of this posting, PAN grants are only available to Medicare patients who need help with their Part D coinsurance costs for HIV prevention medications.
  3. Patient Advocacy Foundation, or PAF: For individuals with insurance but with high deductibles or high coinsurance costs. PAF grants have a financial eligibility limit of 400% FPL, or about $49,000 annually. If you make less than or equal to that amount and require assistance to pay for your medications, a PAF grant will help you. This grant can be combined with the Gilead copay card if necessary.
Members of the Nurx Operations team can help you enroll in any and all of these assistance programs. We’ll advise you as needed after we evaluate your plan’s coverage.

I’m currently uninsured. Can you help me get PrEP?

Possibly. Gilead, the manufacturer of Truvada, offers free temporary access to Truvada to those who qualify financially through their "Advancing Access" program. Enrollment in the program is awarded in 3- to 6-month increments, with a 12-month term limit. Extensions are evaluated on a case-by-case basis by Gilead. To qualify, you must:

  1. Be a current US resident, and be able to provide proof of residency (note: legal immigration status is not required).
  2. Make less than or equal to 500% FPL, or about $59,000 annually.
Gilead will accept the following things for proof of income:
  1. The two most recent pay stubs if paid bi-weekly (4 paystubs if paid weekly)
  2. Last year’s W2 or tax return (if you still have the same job)
  3. A notarized letter outlining one’s income versus expenses.
A member of Nurx’s Operations team will assess whether or not this program is appropriate for you. If you meet the criteria listed above, we’ll fill out the application together, and Nurx will submit it on your behalf. Enrollment determination usually takes between 2-5 days. Two things to note:
  1. If you are currently unemployed or make less that 138% FPL or about $16,395 annually, Gilead will grant you temporary enrollment in the program, but will ask that you apply for Medicaid. If you’re in California, Nurx can help you with that process.
  2. Although Nurx can help you access the medication, you will be responsible for the full cost of the labs required to begin PrEP. The out of pocket amount varies by lab and by location. Unfortunately, no assistance programs exist to help with the cost of labs if you’re uninsured. If this isn’t an option, we’re happy to refer you to a free or low cost clinic in your area to minimize the out of pocket expense.

How does the PrEP lab process work through Nurx?

Your Nurx healthcare provider will order lab work at either Quest or LabCorp. These tests must be completed prior to completing the prescription process. Your healthcare provider at Nurx will order:

  • Full Hepatitis B panel
  • 4th generation HIV test
  • Creatinine clearance test to evaluate kidney function
  • 3-site STI panel
Nurx will mail you a kit with 2 swabs for you to self-collect rectal and pharyngeal samples to be dropped off at the lab when you have your blood drawn. Although this is the standard for all patients, we understand that some patients wish to be tested more frequently for STIs, and visit their local clinics outside of our care. We’re OK with that, and can even help you develop a sexual health plan that works best for you. Usually, the test results are ready in 24-48 hours. The sooner you can visit the lab, the closer you are to having Truvada delivered to your door!

How will Truvada for PrEP arrive?

Truvada is delivered by Fedex via 2-day priority shipping. A signature is required for delivery. The envelope and address are discreet and are not listed with the Nurx logo.

What can I do if I am not in a state that Nurx serves, and my provider refuses to give me PrEP?

If you’re trying to get on PrEP and a health care provider has refused to prescribe it or your insurance won’t cover it, or if you are experiencing difficulty obtaining long term care or life insurance as a result of using PrEP, contact Lambda Legal’s Help Desk at 1-866-542-8336 or www.lambdalegal.org/help. Lambda Legal wants to hear about any problems people are having accessing PrEP, so we can find ways to address these potential barriers to HIV-related care.

Is there an age restriction for getting on PrEP?

For Truvada, users must be at least 18 years of age based on FDA requirements.

I’m in a monogamous relationship. Should I consider PrEP?

A monogamous relationship has long been perceived to be one of the key ways to reduce the individual’s risk of HIV infection.  However, according to research by Woodbury University Psychology Chair Dr. Joye Swan reported in “Monogamy, The Protective Fallacy: Sexual Versus Emotional Exclusivity and the Implications for Sexual Health Risk”, published in the Journal of Sex Research, monogamy — as practiced by couples — may actually increase the risk of infection from HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases. This risk has to do with the perception of invulnerability in a monogamous partnership. Or, more plainly put, you can only control your own encounters. Key takeaways from the study:

  • More than a third of participants reported infidelity in their current self-defined “monogamous” relationship
  • Those in “monogamous” relationships reported using condoms significantly less than individuals in self-defined non-monogamous relationships
  • Sample of more than 650 included 373 heterosexual college students and 282 gay men
“The research is quite profound and certainly flies in the face of convention. The important message is that monogamy, as practiced in the real world, could increase risk of HIV or other STI infection,” says Dr. Swan.

Other

I’m a doctor and would love to work with Nurx, where do I start?

Please reach out to us at info@nurx.co. Our Doctors are licensed clinicians serving your state and most are specialized in an area related to Nurx services.

Are you looking for partners?

Nurx is always on the lookout for partner opportunities, both partnering pharmacies and organizations. Email us at info@nurx.co.

How does Nurx make money?

If you use insurance, Nurx charges your insurance. Insurance pays for the cost of the medication and the consultation/doctors. We pay for the delivery of the medication. If you do not want to use insurance, Nurx will charge you directly.

General Medical Questions

How effective are birth control pills?

When taken as prescribed by the physician, birth control pills are over 99% effective.

Does Nurx replace my primary care physician?

Nurx relieves your primary care physician from certain tasks that our doctors can take care of in a more convenient way. We still believe that a primary care physician plays a key role in providing good healthcare. You should still see your primary care physician for annual checkups and if you have a concern about your health.

Does Nurx replace doctors?

Nurx provides a new way for you to communicate with a doctor, but it does not replace them. When you make a request through our platform, the request is sent to a real live doctor in your state who will provide you the best possible care.

What birth control should I select?

You can find information about different pills and methods directly on our website if you'd like to research on your own.

Making a Selection

If you're not sure what pill or method is best for you, choose the "Let the doctor select a pill for me!" option here. A doctor will review your medical history and help find an option that is well suited for you. The doctor will confirm the prescription with you before we ship your order. It is no problem if you are not sure what birth control you want to pick, or are exploring comparable options to something you were previously prescribed! We can help after we've reviewed more of your health history. Please complete the full survey and mention any concerns about side effects or cost. After reviewing your request, a physician will be in contact about a recommendation for you.

Learn More About All Your Options

Bedsider also contains detailed information about various birth control methods.  

Do the methods of birth control you provide protect against STIs?

Neither the pill the patch or the ring protect against STIs. Condoms are an excellent way of protecting against STIs. Using condoms in conjunction with another form of birth control provides excellent protections against pregnancy and STIs.

How effective are birth control pills?

When taken as prescribed, birth control pills are over 99% effective.

Sexually Transmitted Infections

What are Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs)?

STIs are spread from person to person mostly by sexual contact, including condomless vaginal, anal and oral sex. Some STIs can also be spread through contact to blood or blood products. Many STIs—including chlamydia, gonorrhea, Hepatitis B, HIV, and syphilis—can also be transmitted from mother to child during pregnancy and childbirth. A person can have an STI without having obvious symptoms.

Which STIs are caused by bacteria?

Chlamydia and Gonorrhea

  • two of the most common bacterial STIs in the USA.
  • Caused by Chlamydia Trachomatis and Neisseria Gonorrhea, respectively
  • They can infect the penis, vagina, cervix, anus, urethra, eye, or throat.
  • If left untreated in females, they can lead to pelvic inflammatory disease (PID).
Symptoms, if present, can include the following:
  • Discharge from the penis, anus, or vagina
  • Foul vaginal odor
  • Unusual, irregular bleeding (females)
  • Pain with intercourse (females)
  • Tingling or burning with urination (males)
  • Rectal itching
  • Testicular pain
  • Sore, red throat
Three-site testing
  • Urine, collected in a cup for males and females
  • Rectal swab for males and females
  • Throat swab for males and females
 

Syphilis

  • Another bacterial STI, caused by Treponema Pallidum
  • Curable, but repeatable
  • Unlike gonorrhea and chlamydia, syphilis always has symptoms in the early stages.
  • As syphilis symptoms can mimic many other conditions, it’s best to be evaluated by a health care provider if you notice any sores on your genitals or mouth, or rashes on your body.
Tests ordered, and why it’s important to know your titer
  • RPR or VDRL: These tests aren’t specific to the bacteria that causes syphilis infections, but they do yield a VERY important piece of diagnostic information.
The results of both of these tests are reported as a “titer”. When lab personnel test your blood for syphilis, they try to get it to react with a reference solution. If it does react, lab personnel dilute it again and again, until it doesn’t react anymore. That number is called your titer. It is expressed as 1:X, where 1 equals the reference solution and X equals how many times your blood was diluted. Common values of titers look like 1:1, 1:2, 1:4, 1:8 and so on, and are said “one to one”, “one to two”, etc. This number will go down steadily after you’re treated for syphilis, but it is important to periodically keep an eye on it, because an increase in your titer indicates a new syphilis infection, with or without symptoms. Under certain circumstances, these two tests can yield a reactive result when no infection is present (false positive). For this reason, ANY reactive RPR or VDRL will be followed with a confirmatory test. Diagnosis of a new case of syphilis requires both tests to be performed.
  • TPPA or FTA-Abs, the confirmatory tests: These two tests look specifically for the bacteria that causes syphilis. The results are reported as either “reactive” or non-reactive”. Once either of these tests are positive, they will be for life. This doesn’t mean that you’re still contagious or that you can pass syphilis on, only that the antibodies remain in your blood.
If you test positive for syphilis at any point in your life, remember where and when you were treated. In the event that you see a new provider and get tested you for syphilis, let them know your history of infection (where and when you were treated), so you don’t have to get treated again! OUCH!   Treatable, but repeatable 
  • Provider will recommend best course of action if you test positive for gonorrhea, chlamydia or syphilis
  • Finish ALL treatment medication, even if you feel better or don’t have any symptoms
  • Abstain from sex of any kind for 7 days after treatment
Get partners tested and treated! This will prevent you from getting re-infected!

What are the four “H” viral infections?

Herpes Simplex 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2)

  • Anywhere between 30-95% of the US population is infected with HSV-1
  • HSV-1 causes 80% of “cold sores”, “fever blisters”, or “chancre sores”
  • HSV-2 causes most genital herpes outbreaks
  • Transmitted through direct contact as well as contact with items an infected person has used (chapstick, cups, straws, silverware, water bottles, etc)
  • Very contagious during an outbreak: Try to minimize exposure to the sore. That said, most HSV-1 infections occur from contact to an asymptomatic person
  • Diagnosis is made by physical examination, by testing the fluid present in the sore, or from a blood test
  • Results are not particularly useful because they will not tell you when you were infected
  • Cannot be cured, but managed with medication

Human Papilloma virus (HPV)

  • The most common STI amongst sexually active people, about 79 million Americans are currently infected
  • Many different types (or strains) of HPV
  • Transmitted during vaginal or anal sex
  • Some strains cause genital or anal warts, while others can cause various kinds of cancers
  • Cannot be cured, but can be managed with medication and/or cryotherapy if warts are present
  • There is a vaccine for the nine types of HPV that have been known to cause problems (Gardasil9…ask your provider if this is right for you)

Hepatitis B and C (HBV and HCV)

  • Viral infection of the liver
  • Can be asymptomatic for years, or can be cleared by the immune system
  • Can be cured with medication if acutely or chronically infected
Transmission
  • Condomless sex with an infected person
  • Sharing needles (used for injecting drugs) with an infected person
  • Get a tattoo or piercing with tools that weren't sterilized
  • Sharing personal items like razors or toothbrushes with an infected person
Testing
  • Diagnosis comes from the results of blood tests. A rapid screening test is available for Hep C and can be found at many local public health clinics and syringe access points.
  • Your provider will order certain tests to rule out (or confirm) active infection
  • Some people may test positive, but have no symptoms. In this case, the person is followed very closely for changes.
Treatment
  • For Hep B, several treatment options are available, one being Truvada (the same medication used for PrEP). Your provider will help you decide which regimen is best for you.
  • For Hep C, two vastly improved treatment options are available, where patients take only one pill per day. One of these regimens boasts an over 95% cure rate when treatment is completed. Both of these medications are extremely costly, so coordination with a patient navigator is essential.
Vaccinations
  • A vaccination series is currently available for Hepatitis B. If you've never been vaccinated, ask your provider to get you started on the three injection series. If you're not sure if you have been vaccinated in the past, ask your provider for a blood test to confirm. Note: For most people under 25 who have attended public school in the US, the Hepatitis B vaccination is required for attendance.
  • No vaccine exists currently for Hepatitis C.

Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

  • The virus that causes AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome)
  • Attacks the body's CD4 cells, which help fend off infections
  • Cannot be cured, but can be managed with medications (called antiretroviral therapy, or ART)
  • Can be asymptomatic for years, even without medication
  • The only way to know if you're infected is to get tested!
Transmission Infection happens as a result of exposure and direct contact to any of the 5 fluids of someone who is HIV positive:
  • Blood
  • Semen
  • Pre-cum
  • Vaginal fluid
  • Breast milk
HIV cannot be spread by:
  • Air or water
  • Mosquitoes, ticks or other insects
  • Saliva, tears, or sweat that is not mixed with the blood of an HIV-positive person
  • Shaking hands, hugging, sharing toilets, sharing dishes/drinking glasses, or closed-mouth or “social” kissing with someone who is HIV-positive
  • Drinking fountains
  • Other sexual activities that don’t involve the exchange of body fluids (for example, touching).
Testing
  • Testing is the only way to know your status
  • Rapid tests are available at many local public health clinics and community organizations. Results are available in 10-20 minutes, but can be in as little as one minute!
  • Blood tests can be ordered by your provider
Treatment There are many ART options available to folks who test HIV positive. Your provider will help you choose the best one for you, as well as work with you to determine when to begin treatment. Prevention
  • Condoms, used correctly and consistently for each sex act
  • Water based lubricant to reduce friction and microtearing
  • TasP- Treatment as Prevention: This strategy reduces community viral load, and therefore the risk of HIV transmission, by achieving viral suppression in HIV positive individuals. This requires excellent access to medical care and medication, as well as adherence to one's prescribed ART regimen
  • PrEP- Pre-exposure Prophlylaxis: HIV negative people can take an ART medication (Truvada) daily to stay negative. Please see the FAQ about PrEP.
       

Uncategorized

How about viral STIs?

  • Caused by a virus
  • Can be asymptomatic
  • Possible to transmit even if no symptoms are present
  • Some cannot be cured, but symptoms can be managed with medication
  • Vaccines exist to prevent some viral STIs
 

Questions?

Talk to one of our specialists anonymously, and confidentially, or call (800) 321-NURX

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