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How to Not Get Pregnant Right Now

How to Not Get Pregnant Right Now Image

Things are confusing these days, with so many unknowns — you might not know what day of the week it is or the last time you took a shower. But if you do know for dead certain that you do not want to get pregnant right now, we’re here with some advice.

Don’t skip a dose. 

With the days feeling like one unending ”Blursday” it can be hard to stay on top of your medication. Did you take your birth control pill this morning? Is that patch you’re wearing from this week . . or last?  It’s crucial that you take your birth control on schedule, because missed pills are a major reason that the birth control pill is 99% effective at preventing pregnancy with “perfect use” but only 91% effective with “actual use.” And this is especially true with progestin-only pills (aka minipills).  You need to take your progestin-only pill within the same 3-hour window every day, and if you miss that window you should use a condom or other back-up contraception for at least 2 days.

A birth control reminder app like MyPill can make it a whole lot easier to remember your birth control, with a persistent alarm, snooze feature, and ability to work with the patch, ring, and other forms of birth control. It also allows you to take notes about your cycle and symptoms, plan your vacation around your period, and more. 

Think about longer-term options.

If you want to scratch remembering a daily pill from your list, consider a method that requires less maintenance, like the ring (which you change just once a month) or the birth control shot (which you inject about every three months — and you can do at home).  IUDs and birth control implants provide even longer-term protection, but because those require an in-office procedure they may not be an option right now.

Have emergency contraception on hand.

It’s always smart to have the morning-after pill in your medicine cabinet, in case a condom breaks or you forget a birth control pill (and then forget that you forgot it). Ella is a newer type of EC which is effective for up to 5 days after unprotected sex, and may be a better choice for women who weigh more than 165 pounds. Plan B and its generics can be taken up to 72 hours after unprotected sex. Both medications work by stopping ovulation, and since you never know exactly when you’ll ovulate, the sooner you take them the better. Ella requires a prescription (the Nurx medical team can write you one), and Plan B is available over-the-counter at drugstores (but we can send it to you if that’s easier).

Birth control issues?  Just reach out.

If you need a new prescription, want to switch birth control methods, or need emergency contraception, Nurx is here for you. Our medical team is hard at work and standing by to get you the care you deserve during the Covid crisis, and always.

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