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Ortho Evra

If you don’t like taking a daily pill, try the patch instead! Ortho Evra is a transdermal contraceptive patch (meaning a patch that goes on your skin) that you wear for three weeks. You can place it on your arm, back, stomach, or butt, and it will release hormones over the course of three weeks. At the end of that time, you remove the patch for a week before replacing it with a new one. For maximum effectiveness, instructions must be followed closely.

Our team at Nurx can prescribe Ortho Evra at special request, or can offer the generic equivalent Xulane for as low as $0 with insurance or as little as $180/three patches without insurance.

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FAQ

  • How Effective Is the Patch?

    The CDC reports that the birth control patch is about 91 percent effective with typical use.

  • Who Should Not Use Ortho Evra?

    This birth control patch may not be a good fit for someone with a history of blood clots. Ortho Evra is not recommended for women who are breastfeeding.

  • What Are the Risks of Using Ortho Evra?

    Using the patch may increase the risk for heart attack, stroke, or blood clots. However, instances of these conditions developing due to the patch are extremely rare. Some users experience minor skin irritation at the site of the patch.

  • What Are the Benefits of Using Ortho Evra?

    The patch is safe, easy to use, and convenient. It may also make periods lighter, ease menstrual cramps, and reduce acne.

  • How Do I Use the Patch?

    Wear one Ortho Evra patch per week for three weeks in a row. Make sure you always change your patch on the same day of the week. On the fourth week, do not wear a patch. The patch can be applied to your arm, back, stomach, or butt. Make sure your skin is clean and dry before applying, and avoid putting any lotions, oils, powders, or makeup on that area while the patch is on.

  • How Does Ortho Evra Prevent Pregnancy?

    The Ortho Evra patch contains estrogen and progestin. These hormones stop the ovaries from releasing eggs so fertilization can't take place.

  • Does the Ortho Evra Patch Work Right Away?

    The hormones in the patch will start working as soon as you apply it. However, you should continue to use backup birth control for the first few days after you start using the patch.

  • Does the Ortho Evra Patch Cause Weight Gain?

    Many women have noticed minor weight gain while taking Ortho Evra, but the symptoms were mild, and they gained only a few pounds. However, weight is very important when considering this birth control because the patch is not recommended for women over 198 pounds and may be less effective for women over 176 pounds.

  • What Else Should I Know About Ortho Evra?

    Tell your doctor if you have any allergies or are taking any medications before you start using the birth control patch (or any other form of birth control for that matter). Not only can the hormones affect the medication in your body, the patch itself can irritate your skin if you have certain allergies. Letting your doctor know about any potential problems can save you from uncomfortable and even life-threatening side effects.

  • What Are the Side Effects of Taking Ortho Evra?

    As with most forms of birth control, there are a few common side effects that you may experience while using the patch. These include tender breasts, bleeding between periods, nausea, and vomiting. The patch may also affect your mood or your sexual desire. It's important to regularly check the patch site to make sure the skin underneath is healthy. If your skin is red, swollen, or irritated, then you may be having an adverse reaction to the patch. Ortho Evra has a few uncommon side effects that you might experience. Seek medical attention immediately if you have trouble breathing, experience serious headaches that come on suddenly, notice yellowing of the skin or eyes, or have symptoms of a heart attack or stroke. The sooner you seek help, the sooner you can feel better.  

  • What Precautions Should I Take When Taking Ortho Evra?

    You will need to remove your patch and replace it with a new one on a weekly basis. Make sure you place it on clean, dry skin to maximize the chance that it sticks. If the application site is covered in powder or lotion, it might not stick. Ortho Evra shouldn't stop you from doing the activities you love. The patch is designed to stay on in the shower, swimming pool, ocean, or sauna. However, you should occasionally check your patch to make sure it's staying on. Ortho Evra is not approved to prevent sexually transmitted diseases or infections. Continue to use barrier protection such as condoms to prevent the spread of STDs.

  • How Easily Available Is Ortho Evra?

    Ortho Evra is no longer available in the United States. It was discontinued after the FDA approved a generic alternative for women. You can still look for Xulane on the U.S. market if you want an affordable and effective birth control patch. You will need a prescription for the patch, and it can cost up to $150 per week to use. Your health insurance may cover most, if not all, of the expense, depending on which plan you have. If you don't have health insurance, try our services! We help women who need birth control find affordable and reliable solutions. Even if you have health insurance, We might be a better option for you.

  • How Does Ortho Evra Work?

    The way that birth control in patch form works is similar to the way that the more familiar daily pills work. It uses the same chemicals (Norelgestromin-Ethinyl estradiol) and releases the hormones slowly over the course of a three-week period. The hormones are absorbed through the skin, preventing pregnancy. The patch prevents pregnancy in three ways: by preventing ovulation, by thickening the vaginal mucus to block sperm, and by thinning the uterine lining. This means that there's nothing for a fertilized egg to attach to and less for your uterus to shed during your period. Many women prefer the patch instead of the pill because they don't have to remember to take something every day. It's a more hands-off form of contraception.

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