Skip to content

Molluscum Contagiosum

How Do You Prevent Molluscum Contagiosum?

Molluscum contagiosum, a viral infection that affects the skin, can be prevented by avoiding contact with an infected person or their personal items — but of course that’s hard, since you likely don’t know who is infected. You can lessen your chances of contracting the virus, or of sharing it…

How Do You Treat Molluscum Contagiosum?

Treatment for molluscum contagiosum isn’t necessary if your immune system is healthy, as the bumps will eventually fade away and the virus will leave the body. There are some situations in which treatment may be recommended, however. You would be a good candidate for medical intervention if: You have large…

How Do You Get Molluscum Contagiosum?

You can get molluscum contagiosum from skin-to-skin contact with an infected person, or by coming into contact with an object that an infected person had used on their bare skin. Since the virus can survive on surfaces after an infected person has come in contact with it, it can be…

What Are the Symptoms of Molluscum Contagiosum?

Symptoms of molluscum contagiosum include groups of bumps and lesions that are usually painless. Once you come in contact with the virus, the symptoms may not be apparent for up to six months even though the infection is in your body. The average incubation period for the infection is between…

What Is Molluscum Contagiosum?

Molluscum contagiosum is a viral skin infection that can lead to lesions or raised bumps on the top of your skin. The bumps are usually painless and will disappear on their own once the virus leaves your body, which can take anywhere from two months to four years. There are…

Back to top