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Quasense

Quasense is an extended-length oral contraceptive that is a combination of the female hormones estrogen and progestin. Quasense mainly works to prevent ovulation by stopping the release of an egg. Quasense works in two other ways to prevent pregnancy if ovulation should occur: Quasense thickens vaginal fluid to prevent sperm from reaching and penetrating an egg (fertilization), and Quasense creates changes to the uterine wall to keep fertilized eggs from attaching (implantation). Fertilized eggs that don’t attach pass safely out of the body.

Our team at Nurx™ can prescribe Quasense at special request or can offer the generic equivalent Introvale for as low as $0 with insurance or as little as $45 without insurance.

FAQ

  • How Is Quasense Used?

    Quasense is an extended combination birth control pill, which means you take the medication for 13 weeks at a time. Quasense is packaged in a blister card of 91 color-coded tablets. You take the white pill at the same time each day for 84 days, then you take seven peach tablets for the remaining seven days when you should have your period. Since Quasense is an extended oral contraceptive, you will ideally have four periods throughout the year.

    Quasense has other benefits besides preventing pregnancy. The hormone combination in Quasense has shown that it can aid in the prevention of ovarian cysts in the short-term and ovarian cancer in the long-term. Quasense may also be an effective acne treatment for mild to moderate acne and can help treat endometriosis.

    Quasense is a highly effective (99%) birth control when it is taken at the same time each and every day. Keep Quasense safe and effective by storing it in a cool, dry place away from direct sunlight and where children can't reach it. Keep Quasense in a place that is convenient so you remember to take your medication at the same time each day. While Quasense is effective at preventing pregnancy, it does not protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

  • Is Quasense Easy to Get?

    Quasense is available at most pharmacies and may be covered by your insurance. Quasense has a retail price of $140 for a 91-day supply, but costs may be reduced by your insurance plan. You will need a medical professional's approval to get a prescription for Quasense. Talk to our medical providers at Nurx to learn more about paying for Quasense and how you can get started on your medication.

  • What Precautions Should I Take Before Using Quasense?

    Women with a history of blood clotting disorders or high blood pressure should use caution when taking hormonal contraceptives. Women who are diabetic are advised to monitor blood sugar regularly while using birth control. Women over the age of 35 should not smoke while taking oral contraceptives because of the increased risk for heart disease or stroke.

    If you are undergoing treatment for hepatitis C, wait a few weeks following the completion of treatment before starting Quasense. Let your Nurx medical provider know if you're being treated for breast cancer as oral contraceptives may interfere with those meds.

    Some medications can interfere with lab results. If you have elective surgery or lab tests coming up, consider waiting until your procedures are complete before you begin Quasense.

    Allergic reactions to Quasense are rare. If you are allergic to estrogen, you might consider an alternative like the progestin-only mini pill. Seek medical attention if you experience symptoms of an allergic reaction such as rash, swelling of the tongue, face, or throat, or if you have difficulty breathing.

  • Are There Any Known Side Effects?

    When first starting a medication, there is a chance for side effects as your body adjusts to the medication. Most side effects are mild and often go away on their own with consistent use. The most common side effects women report are bloating, fluid retention, headache, and nausea.

    Side effects like nausea and vomiting may be lessened by taking your medication at bedtime or with a meal. Speak with your Nurx medical provider if side effects become a concern or if they don't go away.

    Serious side effects are rare and have been reported in a very small percentage of Quasense users. Seek medical attention if you experience serious side effects like severe abdominal pain, worsening depression, or unusual vaginal bleeding.

  • Can I Take Quasense With Other Medications?

    Yes, but use caution. Quasense is a medication that can react with existing meds to reduce their effectiveness or interfere with treatments. The effectiveness of Quasense may be compromised when combined with other medications, which can increase the chances of getting pregnant.

    Treatments that may be compromised by the addition of oral contraceptives are breast cancer and chronic hepatitis C treatments. Quasense may not work as well and the risk of pregnancy is increased when combined with St. John's wort or HIV medications. Tell your Nurx medical provider about all the medications and supplements you're taking to find out if Quasense is right for you.

  • Can I Buy Quasense Online Through Nurx?

    We can get Quasense for you by special request. Speak to one of our Nurx representatives to learn how you can get Quasense or learn about our other generic equivalents.

  • How Long Would It Take to Deliver Quasense If I Bought It Online?

    Your shipping is free and orders usually arrive in your mailbox in about a week. Our deliveries to your mailbox are discreet, but you can opt to pick up your medication from your local pharmacy instead. Special requests may take slightly longer.

  • Who Makes Quasense?

    Quasense is manufactured in Canada by Patheon, Inc and distributed in the United States by Actavis Pharma, Inc.

  • Will Quasense Stop My Period?

    Yes, but not completely. Quasense is extended-length birth control that you take for 13 weeks before switching to a placebo for seven days, during which your period should occur. Since Quasense changes the lining of the uterus, the usual shedding (menses) may not be quite the same and so your period may be lighter or not happen at all when you first begin the medication. Even if you don't get your period, start the next pack of Quasense on schedule following the seven placebo tablets.

  • What Should I Know If I'm Switching to Quasense?

    Switching your current birth control is pretty easy and just takes a little forethought.

    • If you've never used hormonal birth control, start Quasense as directed and consider using backup birth control for the first week while the medication makes its way into your system.
    • If you're switching from another oral contraceptive, start Quasense on the first Sunday after your period or the same day you would start your previous medication.
    • If you're switching from an IUD, shot, implant, or patch, you can start Quasense right away as directed by your medical provider to keep you protected from the risk of pregnancy.

  • Is Quasense the Same as Seasonale?

    Yes, Quasense is a generic version of Seasonale and contains the same hormones (ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel) and in the same dosage. Other generic versions of Seasonale include Jolessa and Setlakin. Speak with a member of our Nurx team to learn more about extended-length combination oral contraceptives and we'll help you choose the right medication.

  • How Does Nurx Work?

    Nurx is a free platform offering easy online access to doctors and seamless delivery of medications. No more time-consuming trips to the clinic and no more frantic pharmacy runs. We put you in control of your own health, empowering you to get the care you need, when you need it. From diagnosis to delivery of prescriptions, we make every part of getting healthy and staying healthy, better.

    For more information and to sign up, visit  www.nurx.com and follow us @nurxapp on Twitter and Instagram.

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