Skip to content

HIV Prevention

For those looking to stay HIV negative, there are several ways you can prevent an infection. Using condoms is always recommended, but we also encourage you to get regular testing, communicate with your partners about when they were last tested or had a potential exposure, limit sexual activities to oral sex if you’re unsure about someone’s status, don’t share syringes for injection drug use, and use a medication called PrEP

Does Everyone With HIV Develop AIDS?

Having HIV does not mean you will go on to develop AIDS. That being said, without treatment, HIV typically progresses to AIDS about 10 years after you first contract the disease (though this can be different for everyone). To stop this from happening, you will need to receive anti-retroviral therapy…

What Is the Difference Between HIV and AIDS?

What Is HIV? Many people confuse HIV and AIDS. While they go together, it is important to know that HIV stands for the Human Immunodeficiency Virus which is known to cause AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome). When a person develops AIDS, it is classified as Stage 3 HIV. HIV is known…

What Is the Risk of Getting HIV From Oral Sex?

Though it’s theoretically possible, there are currently no known cases of HIV transmission by oral sex. Some factors that could potentially cause an infection through oral sex is direct contact of seminal fluid (from a person living with HIV) and open sores in your mouth or actively bleeding gums. Other…

What Are the Symptoms of HIV In Women?

Although the symptoms of HIV differ between men and women, many people experience few to no symptoms when they first become infected with the virus. In those who do experience symptoms, women often have flu-like symptoms, such as exhaustion, muscle aches, fevers, and enlarged lymph nodes. More serious symptoms may…

How Is HIV Transmitted?

HIV is transmitted through certain bodily fluids, including blood, breast milk, semen, and vaginal/rectal fluids. HIV is actually a fairly difficult virus to transmit, as it dies when it comes in contact with oxygen. HIV requires direct fluid-to-fluid transmission, like through condomless anal sex or by sharing syringes with someone…

What Does an HIV Rash Look Like?

A rash is one of the earliest symptoms of HIV and can look different on different people. Changes in the immune system can trigger various types of skin reactions and other symptoms. The most common type of rash shows up on large areas of the body — such as the…

What Is the Treatment for HIV?

The treatment for HIV involves taking medications that provide antiretroviral therapy, thus slowing down the progression of the virus. No matter how long a person has been living with HIV, the proper treatment can reduce the amount of virus found in the body, called the viral load, and reduce the…

What Are the Symptoms of HIV?

Some of the most common early symptoms of HIV include flu-like symptoms, such as fevers, aching muscles, and night sweats. Flu-like symptoms are most likely to occur within the first one to three weeks after infection. If an HIV infection progresses to late-stage HIV, or AIDS, people can start experiencing…

What Is HIV?

HIV, or Human Immunodeficiency Virus, is a virus that attacks the immune system. It it transmitted through blood, breast milk, semen, and vaginal/rectal fluids. It can only be passed through certain sexual activity, blood transfusions (before 1985), and by sharing syringes. Once in your system, HIV will begin attacking your…

What is PrEP?

PrEP (Pre-exposure Prophylaxis) is for people who are not living with HIV and would like to remain HIV-negative and is a combination of safe sex practices and a daily medication. Currently, the only FDA approved medication for PrEP is Truvada®. It was approved for HIV prevention in 2012 and contains…

How much does PrEP cost?

Consultation Anyone who requests a PrEP evaluation will be charged a $12 consultation fee. This covers your online medical consultation and review of your lab test results, and includes unlimited messaging about PrEP with our medical team until your next renewal — so you can ask questions about your lab…

How do I get PrEP through Nurx?

Nurx is an easy, discreet, and judgement free way to access PrEP. This entire process can take as few as 7 days, depending on how quickly you get your lab work completed. How this works: Request PrEP through our app or website Answer a few basic questions about your health…

What is the difference between PrEP and PEP?

If PrEP is like birth control, then PEP is like emergency contraception. PEP (Post-exposure Prophylaxis) is a medication regimen someone who is currently HIV-negative can take to reduce their risk of becoming infected after they have been exposed to HIV. PEP must be started within 72 hours after a possible…

How effective is PrEP?

Truvada® for PrEP is highly effective at preventing HIV when taken as prescribed. Studies have shown that PrEP reduces the risk of getting HIV through sexual activity by up to 99% and by more than 70% among people who inject drugs. For more information on specific research, please click here.

How will my PrEP order arrive?

Your PrEP order will be delivered via FedEx 2-Day Priority Shipping, with signature required. Often orders are delivered during business hours, so please let our customer care team know if you need to waive the signature requirement or have your order shipped to a different address. The package arrives in…

How does PrEP work?

Truvada® for PrEP works by blocking an enzyme called HIV reverse transcriptase. By blocking this enzyme, it prevents HIV from making more copies of itself in the body. You will remain HIV negative if the virus can’t make enough copies of itself in your system.

How long do I need to take PrEP?

You take Truvada® for PrEP as long as you are at risk for contracting HIV. For some people this can mean for the duration of a relationship, and for others this can mean for a lifetime. PrEP is something that you can start and stop at any time without long-term…

Is PrEP right for me?

The CDC suggests that PrEP is an excellent option for people who are: weigh at least 77 pounds (35kg), are currently HIV-negative, and meet one or more of the following criteria: In a sexual relationship with someone who is living with HIV, especially when they are not undetectable In a…

Back to top