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Birth Control

Are All Birth Control Pills the Same?

No, they aren’t. There are two main types of birth control pills: combination pills and progestin-only pills. In addition, there are pills designed to maintain a regular monthly period and others which eliminate your period for months at a time. Combination Pills vs. Progestin-Only Pills The combination pill is the…

How Long Does It Take to Get Pregnant After Stopping the Birth Control Shot?

It usually takes at least a few months for your fertility to return after stopping the birth control shot. Women who have been using the shot for a year or more may have to wait longer until they are able to conceive. Earliest Chance to Conceive It’s…

How Do I Stop the Birth Control Shot?

When you decide to stop the birth control shot simply don’t get your next scheduled injection.  If you’ve received a prescription for the birth control shot, it will likely cover your injections for one year. Since the shot is given every 12 to 14 weeks, most prescriptions include …

How Do I Start the Birth Control Shot?

You can start the birth control shot, also called Depo-Provera or Depo-SubQ Provera 104, as soon as you receive a prescription from your health care provider. This birth control option uses Medroxyprogesterone, a hormone that mimics what your body produces naturally, to prevent the release of an…

How Do I Get Birth Control Pills?

Birth control pills widely available, but you do need a prescription from a health care provider. You can get a prescription from your doctor, health clinic, or (in a few states) from a pharmacist. You can also get a birth control prescription online in many states. The health care provider…

Why Aren’t There Over-The-Counter Birth Control Pills?

Birth control pills are fairly easy to get through health care providers (whether at a doctor’s office, health clinic, or through online medical providers), leading many people to wonder why they’re not available over-the-counter. At this point, a prescription is still needed for birth control pills in the U.S., although…

How Effective Is the Birth Control Ring?

When used correctly, the birth control ring (NuvaRing) is 99% effective at preventing pregnancy. Correct use of the NuvaRing involves putting it into your vagina and leaving it in for three weeks, then removing it for a week before replacing it and starting the cycle again. If you don’t put in…

Who Can Use a Birth Control Ring?

The birth control ring, also known as NuvaRing, is an effective and simple birth control method that most women can use. This small, flexible ring is inserted into your vagina and left there for three weeks. At the start of the fourth week, you’ll remove the ring and your period…

What Are the Benefits of Using a Birth Control Ring?

The birth control ring, also called the NuvaRing, is a simple and easy way to prevent pregnancy. It also offers additional benefits, such as reduced hormonal acne, period regulation, and lighter PMS symptoms. The NuvaRing is a small, flexible ring that you place in your vagina. It…

How Does a Birth Control Ring Work?

The birth control ring delivers hormones into the bloodstream through the vagina. The vaginal walls absorb the hormones, and the hormones signal the ovaries to not release an egg. The extra hormones also thicken the cervical mucus to prevent sperm from reaching an egg. The hormones in the birth control…

What Are the Risks of Getting an IUD?

About 10% of American women who use birth control choose to get an intrauterine device (IUD). IUDs, which are available in hormonal and copper varieties, are generally quite safe but come with a unique set of risks not associated with other forms of birth control. The risks…

What Are the Risks of Birth Control Pills?

The risks associated with birth control pills are rare and vary based on a wide range of factors, including weight, age, medical history, lifestyle choices, and the type of birth control pill you’re taking — combination birth control or progestin-only birth control. The pill is very safe overall, but as…

What Are the Side Effects of Birth Control Pills?

Birth control pills deliver a dose of hormones to alter your body’s hormone levels and prevent pregnancy. Some birth control pills contain a combination of estrogen and progestin (combination pills); others progestin only. The hormone fluctuation can cause common side effects that tend to fade over time as your body…

Who Should Use Progestin-Only Birth Control Pills?

While progestin-only birth control pills are a safe and effective option for many women seeking to prevent pregnancy, in particular, there are a few kinds of women who benefit from them most. These include: Women over the age of 35. Women who have a history of blood clots. Women who…

How Do Progestin-Only Birth Control Pills Work?

Progestin-only birth control pills work by delivering a consistent dose of the hormone progestin. When this hormone enters the body, it performs several main functions that stop you from getting pregnant: It thickens the mucus in the cervix so that sperm aren’t able to make it to the uterus to…

What Are the Different Types of Progestin-Only Birth Control?

There are four main types of progestin-only birth control methods, including: The progestin-only birth control pill (mini-pill). The progestin IUD. The progestin implant. The progestin shot. Each of these methods works by providing you with a dose of progestin, a hormone that thickens your cervical mucus so sperm can’t enter…

What Are the Side Effects of Progestin-Only Birth Control?

Common side effects of progestin-only birth control can include: Menstrual periods that become irregular, including cycles that last shorter or longer than usual, heavy bleeding, light bleeding, or no bleeding at all. Breast tenderness. Nausea or vomiting. Headaches. Loss of bone density. Rashes in areas of your skin, including darker…

Where Is a Birth Control Implant Inserted?

The birth control implant is a thin rod that is about the size of a matchstick. It releases progestin into the body which prevents a woman from getting pregnant.  The birth control implant has an efficacy rate of over 90%  and remains effective for five years, after which a woman is…

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